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Voluntary Reentry Agreement

A voluntary reentry agreement, also known as a VRA, is a legal contract that allows certain non-citizen individuals to re-enter the United States after they have been deported. This agreement is usually negotiated between the individual and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and it requires the individual to waive their right to a hearing before an immigration judge.

The VRA is available to certain non-citizens who have been deported or removed from the United States, but who wish to return to the country. In order to be eligible for a VRA, the individual must have been physically present in the United States for a certain period of time prior to their deportation.

The VRA process typically begins when an individual contacts DHS and expresses their desire to return to the United States. DHS will then review the individual`s case to determine whether they are eligible for a VRA. If the individual is eligible, DHS will offer them a VRA agreement, which will outline the terms and conditions of their reentry into the United States.

The terms of a VRA agreement can vary depending on the individual`s case and circumstances. Generally, the agreement will require the individual to waive their right to a hearing before an immigration judge and agree to certain conditions, such as remaining in the United States for a specified period of time or checking in regularly with DHS.

It`s important to note that a VRA is not a guarantee that an individual will be allowed to re-enter the United States. The agreement simply allows the individual to request permission to re-enter the country. DHS will still have the final say on whether the individual is allowed to re-enter the United States.

Overall, a voluntary reentry agreement can be a useful tool for non-citizens who have been deported from the United States but wish to return. If you are considering a VRA, it`s important to consult with an experienced immigration attorney to help guide you through the process and ensure that your rights are protected.